I love the outdoors

More like, the last two months in yoga land have been busy, exhausting, and growth inducing, per usual. Anyone else feel ready for some down time? I’m preparing for my semi-annual cleansing phase where I reset, eat well, give up beer and cheese, and get lots of rest. One of my favorite green things to do is shop at the SLO Co-op and bring my own containers to fill with dried goods. Did someone say zero waste? That’s right, you’re welcome mother earth.

I’ve been on the road more than home lately.

I took a trip to Detroit where I practiced Bikram inspired yoga and was grateful that someone is bringing the yoga to Downriver, Detroit!  Yoga for Peace was a sweet space with great ladies running the show.

I attended Yoga Journal Estes Park and got to be inspired by the Rockies, Elk, Shiva Rea, Rod Stryker, David Swenson, and Sarah Powers in my little 2 x 6 space. Ah, aren’t we lucky to practice in so much space in SLO?

I visited Yosemite for the first time and fell in love with some trees and fresh air. It changed my life.  I can’t believe it took me 8 years to go there and I can’t believe people who live in California aren’t there every weekend. However, as seen here you can easily start your online yoga classes and stay healthy at home.

And lastly, not to fret, my home practice and teaching have been feeling great.  Even my cat soda has taken up the yin yoga practice.   I hope you find some time to practice laying like soda cat as we transition to fall.

When most people think of exercise, they typically think of hitting the indoor gym. While that may seem like the only practical option during the cold, snowy winter months, or during the blistering heat of summer, there is overwhelming evidence that exercising outdoors, otherwise referred to as green exercise, is better for you – both physically and mentally. Read more about biofit healthy benefits.

This idea isn’t new, in fact, the healing power of nature, from the Latin: vis medicatrix naturae is one of the guiding principles of Hippocratic medicine and evolutionary biology and viewed as an essential factor in maintaining and restoring one’s health. [14]

Movement outdoors is intrinsically tied to our humanity. For 99% of human history, not only have we lived off the land and sought nature for basic survival and health, but also for pleasure and physical activity too. [1] 



BENEFIT #1: YOU’LL BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

Take the opportunity to go outside to train. Research shows that the percentage of green space in one’s environment has a positive association with health. Check out the latest Revitaa pro reviews.

Being in nature is a great way to give your immune system a boost. Your body behaves differently when you’re in nature, and acts as a natural stimulus for your body to protect itself from disease. Green exercise is used to describe the additional effects of exercise outdoors over and above the physical activity act itself. [3] 

Research tells us the impact that fresh air, grass, trees and the colours of the natural environment have on mental health and physical well-being. [4] 

Other research highlights that an average of 30 minutes spent in nature leads to increased physical activity and lower prevalence of high blood pressure and depression. [5] 


RELATED: Exercise and the Gut Microbiome


BENEFIT #2: YOU’LL GET A BURST OF VITAMIN D

Yes, going for some exercise in the sun is an excellent way to get some Vitamin D. [6] 

It’s one reason why people who seem to spend so much time outdoors appear to be so healthy. Every time the sun is shining and hitting exposed skin on your body, it’s triggering your body to produce more Vitamin D. Bear in mind that if you live north of San Francisco, California, or south of Melbourne, Australia, then you will not get adequate Vitamin D exposure during winter.

Vitamin D deficiency is increasingly common, especially in young children, the elderly, and people who live in the northern hemisphere. 

Deficiency can lead to brittle bones, osteoporosis, and the bone disorder called rickets. Deficiency has also been linked to an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, increased cancer risk, metabolic syndrome, heart disease and depression. [7] 

BENEFIT #3: YOU’LL BURN MORE CALORIES

Performing the same exercise outdoors is better for you than doing the same activity indoors. That may sound counter-intuitive – how is that possible? – until you consider that working out in a climate-controlled environment does not supply the same stress to your body as working out in an environment that has high (or cold) temperatures and changing terrain which affects gait [9].

Research from the University of Exeter has found that road runners burn more calories when running at the same speed than treadmill runners, mainly because of the wind resistance they encounter [8]. 


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